Bandroom News

Royal connection for Tredegar

Following its move to a brand new campus £57 million teaching and performance facility in the centre of the city, Birmingham Conservatoire has announced that it has been granted royal patronage from Her Majesty The Queen.

Founded in 1859, it will now be known around the world as the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire as it looks to extend its academic scope, which includes acclaimed courses in a wide variety of music - including orchestral and brass bands disciplines.

Strengthen link

Tredegar MD Ian Porthouse is the Conservatoire’s Director of Brass Band Studies, whilst the band has undertaken many high profile concerts and projects there in its role as Brass Band in Residence.  Now Ian believes the news will further strengthen a link that has already gained widespread artistic and critical acclaim, working alongside Principal Prof Julian Loydd Webber and Head of Brass, Chris Houlding (pictured above)

“This is great news for the Conservatoire, and will surely make it an even more attractive destination for ambitious, talented students.  The courses already attract so many talented young musicians, some of who have come to enjoy their time with us at Tredegar.”

Important role

He added: “The band also has such an important role as the Brass Band in Residence, and is stated as one of the reasons why students enjoy their time studying at the Conservatoire, so I hope this will continue to grow in future years too.”

The band also has such an important role as the Brass Band in Residence, and is stated as one of the reasons why students enjoy their time studying at the Conservatoire, so I hope this will continue to grow in future years too - Ian Porthouse

In a letter to announce the news, its Principal, Prof Julian Lloyd-Webber stated: "The Royal title, personally granted by Her Majesty The Queen, marks the start of an exciting new era during which the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire will advance standards of music education in our brand new facilities, in keeping with its role as the first conservatoire of the digital age."

Following its move to a brand new campus £57 million teaching and performance facility in the centre of the city, Birmingham Conservatoire has announced that it has been granted royal patronage from Her Majesty The Queen.

Founded in 1859, it will now be known around the world as the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire as it looks to extend its academic scope, which includes acclaimed courses in a wide variety of music - including orchestral and brass bands disciplines.

Strengthen link

Tredegar MD Ian Porthouse is the Conservatoire’s Director of Brass Band Studies, whilst the band has undertaken many high profile concerts and projects there in its role as Brass Band in Residence.  Now Ian believes the news will further strengthen a link that has already gained widespread artistic and critical acclaim, working alongside Principal Prof Julian Loydd Webber and Head of Brass, Chris Houlding (pictured above)

“This is great news for the Conservatoire, and will surely make it an even more attractive destination for ambitious, talented students.  The courses already attract so many talented young musicians, some of who have come to enjoy their time with us at Tredegar.”

Important role

He added: “The band also has such an important role as the Brass Band in Residence, and is stated as one of the reasons why students enjoy their time studying at the Conservatoire, so I hope this will continue to grow in future years too.”

The band also has such an important role as the Brass Band in Residence, and is stated as one of the reasons why students enjoy their time studying at the Conservatoire, so I hope this will continue to grow in future years too - Ian Porthouse

In a letter to announce the news, its Principal, Prof Julian Lloyd-Webber stated: "The Royal title, personally granted by Her Majesty The Queen, marks the start of an exciting new era during which the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire will advance standards of music education in our brand new facilities, in keeping with its role as the first conservatoire of the digital age."

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